Christian Cyclopedia

About the Cyclopedia





Language Question in the Lutheran Church (US).

The Luth. Ch. was transplanted to Am. mainly by Germans and Scandinavians. Since Am. became an Eng.-speaking country, Luths. adopted the Eng. language. The New York Ministerium made Eng. its official language 1807. Failure to use Eng. had adverse effects in some cases.

Many feared that a change of language from Ger. would lead to loss of pure doctrine. In many places, strong opposition against language transition resulted in ch. membership losses. In some cases the problem was temporarily solved by organizing Eng. syns. Over the yrs. the change to Eng. was effected. Nearly all Luths. in the US now worship and transact churchly affairs in Eng. ARS

W. A. Baepler, A Century of Grace (St. Louis, 1947); Documentary History of the Evangelical Lutheran Ministerium of Pennsylvania and Adjacent States (Philadelphia, 1898); V. Ferm, The Crisis in American Lutheran Theology (New York, 1927); J. L. Neve, History of the Lutheran Church in America, 3d ed., prepared by W. D. Allbeck (Burlington, Iowa, 1934); J. Nicum, Geschichte des Evangelisch-Lutherischen Ministeriums vom Staate New York und angrenzenden Staaten und Ländern (Reading, Pennsylvania, 1888); W. G. Polack, The Building of a Great Church, 2d ed. (St. Louis, 1941); A. R. Wentz, A Basic History of Lutheranism in America, rev. ed. (Philadelphia, 1964).


Edited by: Erwin L. Lueker, Luther Poellot, Paul Jackson
©Concordia Publishing House, 2000, All rights Reserved. Reproduced with Permission

Internet Version Produced by
The Lutheran Church--Missouri Synod


Original Editions ©Copyright 1954, 1975, 2000
Concordia Publishing House
All rights reserved.

Content Reproduced with Permission

Stay Connected! Join the LCMS Network:

Contact Us Online
800-248-1930
(Staff Switchboard)
888-843-5267
(Church Info Center)
1333 S Kirkwood Rd
Saint Louis, MO 63122-7226 | Directions

 

Featured Publication

The Lutheran Witness

LCMS Communications

Interpreting the contemporary world from a Lutheran Christian perspective.
Visit TLW Online